Spotlighted by the Manitoba Writer’s Guild

Pretty cool to be SPOTLIGHTED as a Manitoba author by the Manitoba Writer’s Guild this month. It feels like not long ago I debated whether I would be called an “author” or not.
In July I will provide a workshop on writing non-fiction.

Spotlight by the MWG

MEMBER SPOTLIGHTBOB CHRISMAS, PhD

What’s your genre?  My writing lane was academic, having learned to write mostly through my grad studies, working through my Master Public Administration and then later my PhD in Peace and Conflict Studies. One of my professors had suggested why not publish papers you write for course assignments? It sent me on a whole new publications path. I found though, over the years, that I really preferred writing literature for formats that had a chance of reaching a broader audience. Articles and opinion pieces seemed fulfilling. With over 40 journal articles, several book chapters, and many other smaller pieces I had always wondered about fiction.     Then the pandemic came and I found myself locked down in my home office for several weeks, with that fictional story that I’d been mulling for some time. I didn’t have the details but the general idea was there. It would be a story to raise awareness about sex trafficking in Canada and would draw on my PhD research and over 30 years of policing experience. I viewed several online courses on writing fiction, and YouTube videos that are available for free by the truckload and started to learn about writing fiction. I ordered some classics that are regarded as some of the best written and Amazon brought them right to my door. The biggest difference, I found, was that the fictional story shows more than tells the story.     Once I started writing it, I fell in love with having the freedom to make the story. I was able to highlight the aspects I felt important and describe them with emotion that I felt less of in my non-fiction writing. My first fictional book, The River of Tears was born. I’ll call it literary fiction, because I tried to get into the heads of the protagonists and the challenges that families of missing persons face. I tried to describe dynamics around missing and murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, and police-Indigenous relationships in Canada.     When it came time to publish, I started to reach out with proposals and started to receive the usual round of rejections. Then I came across a press that specializes in academic peer reviewed non-fiction with a focus on progressive socially-just publishing. I sent DIO Press a proposal and said I know you do not publish fiction, but I feel this might fit your imprint. They agreed and said they were breaking into fiction.       The two lessons I learned and wish to share with you are as follows. First, don’t get stuck in one genre. Do what your heart desires and see where it takes you. You might not have found your strongest voice if you have not experimented with multiple genres. The second lesson is to not restrict yourself from publishing houses or venues you think might not be interested. Put yourself out there and let them tell you if your work fits their imprint.Learn more about Bob at: https://bchrismas.com Books:The River of Tears. New York: DIO Press Inc. (Bob Chrismas, 2021).Sex Industry Slavery: Protecting Canada’s Youth. Toronto, ON, Canada: University of Toronto Press. (Bob Chrismas, 2020).Our Shared Future: Windows into Canada’s Reconciliation Journey. New York: Lexington. (Laura Reimer & Bob Chrismas, 2020).Canadian Policing in the 21st Century: A Frontline Officer on Challenges and Changes. Montreal, Canada: McGill-Queen’s University Press. (Bob Chrismas, 2013).

Interview on CJOB/Global regarding a positive Appeal Court Decision that refers to my research.

Audio Vault (globalnews.ca) at 13 December, 2021 at 3:36:40PM (refers to my research and book)

Audio Vault (globalnews.ca) at 14 December 2021 at 4:36PM

HERE IS THE DECISION:   R. v. Alcorn, 2021 MBCA 101

Full publications list:

Bob Chrismas’s Publications:

Books:

The River of Tears. New York: DIO Press (2021).

Sex Industry Slavery: Protecting Canada’s YouthToronto, ON, Canada: University of Toronto Press (2020).

Canadian Policing in the 21st Century: A Frontline Officer on Challenges and Changes. Montreal, Canada: McGill-  Queen’s University Press (2013).
•  Runner-up for best non-fiction,  Manitoba Book Awards, 2013.

Edited books:

Our Shared Future: Windows into Canada’s Reconciliation Journey. New York: Lexington Books, Rowman & Littlefield (Laura Reimer and Bob Chrismas, 2020).

Ph.D. Dissertation:

Modern Day Slavery and the Sex Industry: Raising the Voices of Survivors and Collaborators While Confronting Sex Trafficking and Exploitation in Manitoba, Canada. Available online at MSpace, University of Manitoba (2017).
•  University of Manitoba Distinguished Dissertation Award, 2017

Book chapters:

McFee, D. & R. Chrismas (2020). “The Evolution of Canadian Policing and Reconciliation” in Reimer, L. & R. Chrismas. (2020, in press). Our Shared Future: Windows into Canada’s Reconciliation Journey. New York: Lexington Books, Rowman & Littlefield.

Chrismas, R. (2019).Raising the Voices of Survivors and Collaborators Confronting Sex Trafficking and Exploitation of Indigenous Women and Girls in Manitoba, Canada” in Jennifer Markides & Laura Forsythe. (2019). Research Journeys in/to Multiple Ways of KnowingChapter 7, p. 63-72. New York, New York: DIO Press Inc.

Chrismas, R. (2019). “The Meaning of Words: Qualitative Research Addressing Social Challenges.” In Reimer, L., Standish, K., Thiessen, C. (2019). Expanding the Edges of Narrative Enquiry: Research from the Mauro InstituteNew York, NY: Lexington Books, Rowman & Littlefield.

Chrismas, R. (2018). “Stories From Survivors of Canada’s Sex Industry.” in Conflict Transformation, Peace-building and Storytelling: Research from the Mauro Centre. Volume 1, Chapter 4. New York: Lexington Books, Rowman & Littlefield.

Peer-reviewed journal articles:

Chrismas, R. and Brandi Chrismas (2021) “Modern Day Slavery Human Rights and the Sex Industry,” Journal of Community Safety and Well Being. vol. 6 no. 4 (December) p. 179-183.

Hodzic, S. & R. Chrismas(2019).“The Politics of Pot in Canada: Consumers, Enforcers and Profiteers.” Journal of Community Safety and Well Being.  vol. 4 no. 2 (August) p.19-21.

Chrismas, R. (2019). “All the flowers may die, but the thistles will live”: Sex trafficking through the eyes of a police officer-researcher.” Dignity: A Journal of Sexual Exploitation and Violence. vol. 4, Iss. 1, Article 7.

Chrismas, R. (2018). “The Power in Stories That Cannot Be Replaced.” The Qualitative Report, 23 (12), p. 3118-35.

Hodzic, S. & R. Chrismas (2018). “Taking Back the Power: The link between poverty and Canada’s sex industry.” Journal of Community Safety and Well Being. vol. 3 no. 2, (October) p. 34-37.

Chrismas, R. (2018). “Gaining a fuller picture of sex trafficking in Manitoba: A case study of narrative-based research utilizing ‘low tech’ thematic analysis.” Journal of Research Practice, 14 (1). Athabasca University.

Chrismas, R. & S. Byrne. (2018). “The Evolving Peace and Conflict Studies Discipline.” The Journal For Peace and Justice Studies.” vol. 27 issue 2, p. 98-118.

Chrismas, R. (2018). “Police Corruption and Canada’s Distinction.” African Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences. vol. 1, issue 1. p. 9-23.

Chrismas, Brandi & R. Chrismas. (2017). “What are we doing to protect newcomer youth in Canada, and help them succeed?” (December) Journal of Community Safety and Well Being. vol. 2 no. 3, (December) p. 87-90.

Chrismas, R. (2016). “Policing on Turtle Island: The Continued Evolution of Policing and First Nations Peoples in Canada.” Journal of Community Safety and Well Being, vol. 1, no. 2 (August) p. 44-50.

Chrismas, R. (2016). “Perceptions on Confronting Sexual Exploitation in Canada: An Introduction to New Primary Research.” Journal of Community Safety and Well Being, vol. 1, no. 2 (August) p. 4-6.

Chrismas, R. (2013). “Multi-Track Diplomacy and Canada’s Indigenous Peoples.” Peace Research: The Canadian Journal of Peace and Conflict, vol. 45, no. 1, p. 5- 30.

Chrismas, R. (2012). “The people are the police: Building trust with Aboriginal communities in contemporary Canada.” Canadian Public Administration vol. 55, no. 3 (September) p. 451–70.

Chrismas, R. (2012). “An Arranged Marriage: police-media conflict and collaboration.”Canadian Graduate Journal of Sociology and Criminology. vol. 1, issue 1 (October) p. 43-51.

Professional journals/magazine articles:

Chrismas, R. (2021). “What does it mean to be a good company?” Convenience and Carwash Canada.

Chrismas, R. (2021). “How a Truck Stop Waitress Solved a Serial Murder Case in Canada.” Convenience and Carwash Canada (September).

Chrismas, R. (2021). “Convenience stores can be safe havens” Convenience and Carwash Canada (july/August).

Chrismas, R. (2021). “How can convenience stores be good citizens?” Convenience and Carwash Canada (May/June).

Chrismas, R. (2021). “The most important six inches in self defence.” Convenience and Carwash Canada (April).

Chrismas, R. (2021). “Think Like a Thief: Cyber Security For Your Business.” Convenience and Carwash Canada (February).

Chrismas, R. (2020). “The Freedom of Convenience.” Convenience and Carwash Canada (November).

Chrismas, R. (2020). “Sex Industry Slavery: Protecting Canada’s Youth.” Blog for University of Toronto Press web page.

Chrismas, R. (2020). “Good Help is Hard to Keep: Employee Retention in the Post-COVID Era.” Convenience and Carwash Canada (July).

Chrismas, R. (2020). “Enhance Your Success By Keeping Employees Safe.” Carwash & Convenience Magazine (February issue).

Chrismas, R. (2019). “Ethnic Diversity in Policing.” Justice Report, vol. 34. no. 1 (February). Canadian Criminal Justice Association.

Chrismas, R. (2019). “Selling Cannabis.” Convenience and Carwash Canada (January issue).

Chrismas, R. (2018). “Why Write?” Blog for Institute of Public Administration, Canada- Manitoba Chapter.

Chrismas, R. (2018). “Protecting employees and customers from drug-fueled violence.” Convenience and Carwash Canada. (Spring issue).

Hodzic, Sandra and R. Chrismas. (2018). “Protecting Refugee Children from Gangs.” Manitoba School Councillor. (Spring).

Chrismas, R. (2016). “Confronting sex trafficking and exploitation in Canada.” Multi-Briefs (February).

Chrismas, R. (2015). “The Colonial Wake, Reconciliation and Community Oriented Policing with Inuit, Metis and First Nations People in Canada.” Justice Report, vol. 30. no. 3 (September). Canadian Criminal Justice Association.

Chrismas, R. & C. Ponce-Joly (2015). “Multi-Disciplinary Collaboration- An Essential Tool and Skill of Responsible Public Service in High-Risk Service Provision” Justice Report, vol. 30. no. 2 (June). Canadian Criminal Justice Association.

Chrismas, R. (2015). “Community Policing in the Age of Technology.” Justice Report, vol. 29, no. 4 (Fall). Canadian Criminal Justice Association.

Chrismas, R. (2014). “Is Your Agency Up to The Challenges of Modern Administration?ImPact, Institute of Public Administration, Canada. (April).

Chrismas, R. (2013). “Law Enforcement and Change” Law Enforcement Today. (August).

Chrismas, R. (2013). “A Frontline Officer Reflects” Blue Line Magazine. (September).

Newspaper articles:

Chrismas, R. (2014, 4 October). “Winnipeg’s compassionate past still needed.” Winnipeg Free Press.

Chrismas, R. (2014, 6 September). “The life some people choose, but nobody wants.” Winnipeg Free Press.

Chrismas, R. (2014, 2 August). “Do police give different treatment to different neighbourhoods?” Winnipeg Free Press.

Chrismas, R. (2014, 5 July). “Shared responsibility the only solution to social problems.” Winnipeg Free Press.

Chrismas, R. (2014, 5 April). “We can pay now or pay more later.” Winnipeg Free Press.

Chrismas, R. (2014, 4 January). “It’s our future: what are we doing for youth?” Winnipeg Free Press.